The Mauds

The Mauds

The Mauds "Hold On"

 

The Mauds

 

The year is 1965 and by now every music-minded kid in Chicago and its mighty suburbs has seen the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. Guitar sales have skyrocketed, harmonicas have made a comeback and barbers are complaining that their business has fallen off…just a hair. Every suburb, every neighborhood, every block has a band. What teenage boy with music running through his testosterone clogged veins could turn down the opportunity to strap on a guitar and make the girls scream? Certainly not a group of friends from the North Shore who dubbed themselves The Mauds®. Like their peers from all over Chicagoland, they honed their craft at parties, sock hops and eventually the local club circuit. But unlike their peers, The Mauds® weren’t busy trying to write the next She Loves You. Instead their interests were directed towards the burgeoning mid 60’s soul scene. And why not? Lead singer Jimy Rogers possessed the beginnings of a truly legitimate set of blue-eyed soul pipes. Under the cover of night, these 5 teenage, suburban white boys were sneaking into the various South side soul emporiums to bear witness to their heroes…Sam and Dave, Redding and Mayfield.
Let’s face it, you’ve either got it or you don’t. Jimy Rogers had it and he knew it. So did everyone who saw him and The Mauds® perform. By late ’66 Jimmy Sohns of the Shadows of Knight was a fan, and he did what fans do, helped the band get a recording contract. They were introduced to legendary Chicago producer Bill Traut. Under his guidance the band recorded their Hold On album for Mercury Records in 1967. Now it was radio’s turn to take notice. And they did. The Maud’s screamin’ cover of Hold On roared up the charts in the summer of ’67 on both WLS and WCFL.
Now The Mauds® are packin’ ‘em in and knockin’ ‘em dead all over Chicago and the Midwest, picking up new fans at every stop. Some of those new fans were local musicians who would watch them from the audience at clubs like Mothers on Division. Members of a new band in town who were going by the name of Chicago Transit Authority, later shorted to Chicago, couldn’t get enough of The Mauds® and actually played on a couple of their singles including the band’s 1968 hit, Soul Drippin’. It was the kind of chemistry that left fans beggin’, screamin’, and shoutin’ for more. But not a whole lot more followed for The Mauds®. Although they scored another hit with Knock On Wood, the all too familiar trappings of the industry eventually got the better of the band and by 1971, The Mauds® called it a day.