The Flock

The Flock

The Flock - Early Chicago

 

The Flock

The Flock - Early Chicago

 

The Flock was a Chicago-based jazz-rock band that released two records
on Columbia records in 1969 (The Flock) and 1970 (Dinosaur Swamps).
The Flock did not achieve the commercial success of other Columbia jazz-
rock groups of the era such as Chicago and Blood Sweat & Tears, but
were most notable for their inclusion of a prominent violin in their
recordings. The violinist, Jerry Goodman, went on to become a member of
Mahavishnu Orchestra and a solo artist.
The members at the time of their 1969 studio recording were Fred
Glickstein (guitar, lead vocals), Jerry Goodman (violin), Jerry Smith (bass),
Ron Karpman (drums), Rick Canoff (saxophone), Tom Webb (saxophone)
and Frank Posa (trumpet).
After a highly promising first album that was further "outside," jazz/fusion-
wise than either Chicago or BS&T (owing, to a great extent, to the
influence of Miles Davis' Bitches Brew album, which Webb participated in,
but whose performance was not recorded), Columbia Records' Clive Davis
raided The Flock, stealing Goodman for the Mahavishnu Orchestra project:
apparently jazz violinist Jean-Luc Ponty was guitarist-bandleader
Mahavishnu John McLaughlin's first choice, but the U.S. government would
not grant Ponty a work-permit visa. The effect of taking Goodman out of
The Flock was predictably disastrous, the rough equivalent of pulling
George Harrison out of The Beatles.
The Flock reunited briefly in 1975 for an album Inside Out, and in 2004 a
CD was released of a 1973 live concert called Live in Europe, which
features Michael Zydowsky on violin in place of Goodman and includes
original members Fred Glickstein, Jerry Smith, and Ron Karpman.